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About me and my values...

I am a Clinical Psychologist and a parent of three children. I am passionate about helping parents and teens to manage their wellbeing; to enable them to thrive, rather than simply survive, the GCSE years.

As a Mum, I know how it feels to be worried or concerned or unsure about your child's well-being (yeah, I feel that way too). You want to understand and address the concern to make things better for them. When your child is a teenager it can be really hard to reach that understanding and make a difference as you can come across a lack of engagement, fierce striving for independence and a push again you and your advice. This can leave you in a position of seeing the struggle but not knowing how to get in there and help. Your teen can be in a position of needing help but not knowing how to ask for or accept the help on offer. Recent research from psychology and neuroscience can help us to understand what is going on at this time. I believe that with more knowledge, we are in a better position to consider what to do - although I am not saying this is easy. 

As a a registered Clinical Psychologist in the UK I have worked for over 20 years with children and families many of whom come during the teenage years for help with anxiety. This anxiety is often the result of trying to manage the various pressures of this time including relationships with friends (and those who are not friends), revision, other stress relating school work, tension in the family home, trying to find time for and wanting to do well in after school activities and hobbies . During the key GCSE school years of 9, 10 and 11, these stresses can increase making it hard for young people to focus on what is important. It can feel an overwhelming time for teens and their parents.  My wish is to offer support through my blog and specialist online resources including courses and programmes. I share psychological knowledge that will help you and your teen to understand why this time is so hard. I provide opportunities for you and your teen to learn helpful tool and skills to better navigate this challenging time and maintain your wellbeing into the future.    

My Story

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My family x 

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Looking through family photos of me during my teen years I was struck by how often I looked utterly miserable, like I just didn't want to be there. We were in a somewhat privileged position in that both of my parents were teachers meaning they were always around in the school holidays. This allowed us to go away, mostly to France and Wales for a number of weeks in July and August each year. My parents worked hard to provide me and my sisters with wonderful experiences but at this time I was just not interested. One particular memory comes to mind. We were on a beach in France and it was a really hot day. My family were enjoying themselves, running in and out of the sea, having a great time. Meanwhile I was sitting on a rock, in a long skirt and thick long-sleeved sweater. I was boiling hot and miserable! I clearly remember my Mum encouraging me to join in, to put on my costume, to have fun (like we used to). At this point in my life, it was a big no from me. I don't remember what it was about particularly, likely it was about feeling self-conscious, but I think it is quite typical of the kind of dynamic that can happen between parents and their teens as young people strives for independence combined with a struggle to find self confidence.

This was 30 odd years ago now and my parents and I did the best we could. We call came through the other side and can now laugh at my teenage times and behaviour. The time on the beach is one of many examples that now make us giggle. I am aware that the life I lived as a teen was tricky enough but a world away from that teens inhabit today. Through my clinical work I have become more and more aware that the online life of your average teenager can make positive psychological development evermore difficult to achieve. I have observed how interactions with peers on social media can negatively impact upon self-esteem, self-worth and confidence. Young people have so much more information available to them and I see them take responsibility to change things for the better, but this can be overwhelming and can take it's toll. During the GCSE years, this can all come together to create the perfect storm for stress, overwhelm and anxiety. 

Over the last 20 years, psychological research has delivered a wealth of knowledge about the teenage brain, behaviour and how we can understand the impact of the world our teens are growing up in. This puts us in a position to understand what is going on.  With this knowledge, I am passionate about helping parents move beyond the typical stereotypes of the grumpy teenager (such as Kevin and Perry) to a place of compassion and understanding. I wish to help us all see that the teen years are a time of enormous change which brings wonderful potential for positive growth into adulthood.  

My own children have yet to hit this phase in their lives. My daughter at 11 years is very close though (the signs are there!). I am hopeful that the knowledge we have available to us as parents, will help me and my children to maximise their potential for positive growth over their teen years and beyond and help me and my husband to maintain our well-being!     

My Qualifications and Experience

Dr Rebecca Mount

Clinical Psychologist, UK registered

My experience:

2002 - 2005, Clinical Psychologist in Training

2005 - Qualified Clinical Psychologist

2005 - 2019, Worked in NHS and for Local Government Services in UK for children and families

2011- current, Independent Practice Clinical Psychologist 

2020 - current, Associate Lecturer in Psychology, University of Worcester, UK

My qualifications:

- BSc (Hons) in Psychology (University of Reading)

- PhD in Psychology (University College London)

- Doctorate in Clinical Psychology (University of Birmingham)

- Mum (11 years)

- Wife (13 years)

The British Psychological Society has awarded me Chartered Psychologist status and I am a Registered Practitioner Psychologist with the Health and Care Professions Council (registration number PYL18943).

 

I hold an Associate Lecturer position at The University of Worcester, contributing to teaching on their undergraduate Psychology degree course.

 

I am registered with the Disclosure and Barring update Service for the enhanced check for children and adults and I have professional indemnity insurance. 

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